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Sjögren Syndrome after Radioiodine Therapy in Thyroid Cancer Patients
J Oral Med Pain 2018;43:84-86
Published online September 30, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.14476/jomp.2018.43.3.84
© 2018 Korean Academy of Orofacial Pain and Oral Medicine

Hee Jin Lee, Jae-Jeong Kim, Young-Gun Kim, Hyung-Joon Ahn, Jong-Hoon Choi, Jeong-Seung Kwon

Department of Orofacial Pain and Oral Medicine, Dental Hospital, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Jeong-Seung Kwon
Department of Orofacial Pain and Oral Medicine, Dental Hospital, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea
Tel: +82-2-2228-3111
Fax: +82-2-393-5673
E-mail: jskwon@yuhs.ac
Received June 15, 2018; Revised July 10, 2018; Accepted July 10, 2018.
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction is relatively frequent after radioiodine therapy. In most cases this is a transient side effect, but in some patients it may persist for a long period or appear late. Radioiodine (131I) therapy is often administered to patients following total thyroidectomy to treat well-differentiated follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer. In addition to thethyroid, 131I accumulates in the salivary glands, giving rise to transient or permanent salivary gland damage. Salivary gland dysfunction following radioiodine therapy can be caused by radiation damage. But, it also may be associated with Sjögren syndrome (SS) developed after radioiodine therapy. It would be recommended that the evaluation for SS including anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La should be considered before and after radioiodine therapy.
Keywords : Sjögren’s syndrome; Thyroid neoplasms; Xerostomia


September 2018, 43 (3)