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Vestibular Schwannoma Presenting with Orofacial Dysesthesia: A Case Report
J Oral Med Pain 2019;44:123-126
Published online September 30, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.14476/jomp.2019.44.3.123
© 2019 Korean Academy of Orofacial Pain and Oral Medicine

In Hee Park, Seurin Kim, Youn-Jung Park, Hyung-Joon Ahn, Seong-Taek Kim, Jong-Hoon Choi, Jeong-Seung Kwon

Department of Orofacial Pain and Oral Medicine, Dental Hospital, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Jeong-Seung Kwon
Department of Orofacial Pain and Oral Medicine, Dental Hospital, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea
Tel: +82-2-2228-3111 Fax: +82-2-393-5673 E-mail: jskwon@yuhs.ac https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4584-7355
Received July 23, 2019; Revised August 9, 2019; Accepted August 9, 2019.
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Vestibular schwannoma, also known as acoustic neuroma, is a rare benign brainstem tumor surrounding the vestibular division of the 8th cranial nerve. The presenting symptoms are hearing loss, tinnitus, and dizziness. Unabated growth can compress 5th (trigeminal nerve) and 7th (facial nerve) cranial nerve, which can cause nerve dysfunction such as orofacial pain, sensory abnormalities, or trigeminal neuralgia. We report a 51-year-old woman who presented with orofacial dysesthesia on her left side of the face with abnormal findings on 5th cranial nerve and 8th (vestibulocochlear nerve) cranial nerve examination. Brain magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed cerebellopontine angle tumor. She was referred to a neurosurgeon and diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma.
Keywords : Magnetic resonance imaging; Neuroma, Acoustic; Paresthesia